With a pencil and a protractor, divide the larger disc into 30-degree wedges to create 12 center lines for the bottle indents. Center and trace the smaller disc on top of the larger disc. Next, with a drill press, drill 3/8-in.-deep holes on the 12 center lines with the 1-7/8-in. Forstner bit, spacing them between the disc’s outer edge and the traced circle. Next, divide the smaller disc into 60-degree wedges and drill six more 3/8-in.-deep holes with the Forstner bit.
The moment we first saw this group’s master lather begin his work, we knew we’d found someone special.  He’s a quiet, steady-handed worker. He smiles and lets his group’s work speak for itself.  And it does. We watched in awe as he chipped away angled pieces of wood from a solid block of thick Mugavu – all done “Michelangelo-style” right in front of our eyes. 

Some of our readers prefer watching a video tutorial instead of heaving a written tutorial. For those readers, we are including a YouTube video tutorial for this project, Although, these are two a few different designs in both of the tutorials, but both of them help you in a better way to build two awesome wooden coat rack. You can find the video tutorial in the link below.
There is significant evidence of advanced woodworking in ancient Egypt.[1] Woodworking is depicted in many extant ancient Egyptian drawings, and a considerable amount of ancient Egyptian furniture (such as stools, chairs, tables, beds, chests) has been preserved. Tombs represent a large collection of these artefacts and the inner coffins found in the tombs were also made of wood. The metal used by the Egyptians for woodworking tools was originally copper and eventually, after 2000 BC bronze as ironworking was unknown until much later.[2]
Shorter hand saws (around 20-inches long) are officially called “panel saws” because they can fit in the panel of a large tool chest, and they are more suited for fine furniture making. Most normal hand saws run from 24-inches to 30-inches long. Many people mistakenly call all saws of this type “panel saws”. But don’t be rude and correct them! Try out different sizes to see what length you’re comfortable with.
To corral shelf-dwelling books or DVDs that like to wander, cut 3/4-in.-thick hardwood pieces into 6-in. x 6-in. squares. Use a band saw or jigsaw to cut a slot along one edge (with the grain) that’s a smidgen wider than the shelf thickness. Stop the notch 3/4 in. from the other edge. Finish the bookend and slide it on the shelf. Want to build the shelves, too? We’ve got complete plans for great-looking shelves here. 

My basic advice is to develop lots of connections with people. Most branches of woodworking are hard to sell without knowing the right people – especially when targeting the luxury furnishings or corporate markets. I started down this path with the idea that I might own my own shop but forgot about that once I’d accepted employment in the field. Since I was satisfied working for others, I didn’t bother making the connections, and now I’m so busy it’s hard to get away from the shop long enough to do so. That’s not the end of the world, as we’re still pulling in plenty of work. It just took longer to get there than it should have. For those considering a self-employed woodworking career, it’s a good idea to meet individuals who associate with the types of people that are likely to become future clients. Word-of-mouth is still a powerful form of marketing even in this age of internet.
These 25 projects are absolutely stunning, to say the least. I would love to try out some of these designs all by myself and get started with some serious woodworking that I have been procrastinating for a long time. My favorites among these 25 are definitely the desk organizer, the bowling lane, and the tiered planter, but nevertheless, all are good in their own ways. I believe these projects only require hand tools and basic power tools like a rudimentary router and a jigsaw.
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