Initially I thought a wine rack would be a finicky project to create, with the necessity of holding the bottles at a certain angle, etc. However, this ended up being a quick, easy and fun build. The shape of the bottles lets them rest on the rack at the correct angle (which is really only important when you are going to let your wine age). The simplicity of the design also allows you to see the labels on the bottles.


Some of our readers prefer watching a video tutorial instead of heaving a written tutorial. For those readers, we are including a YouTube video tutorial for this project, Although, these are two a few different designs in both of the tutorials, but both of them help you in a better way to build two awesome wooden coat rack. You can find the video tutorial in the link below.
A good friend celebrated a milestone birthday this year, and since he’s a real wine afficionado, I wanted to give him a few very nice bottles of wine presented in a special way. I’ve seen expensive vintage wines sold in wooden presentation boxes, but I wanted to make something that’s well beyond the ordinary. So I designed a box that presents the wine bottles by “popping them up” as the lid is opened.
Wall-mounted or placed on a table or countertop, this handsome display cabinet is the perfect way to share any collection while keeping it clean and protected at the same time. Featuring tempered glass doors and three shelves, the cabinet’s design calls for all straight cuts and straightforward construction techniques (simple cut-outs give the effect of
“Back saws” are specifically designed for fine joinery work (they have a rigid steel or brass back to keep the blade stiff). Dovetail back saws are the smallest back saws (typically 8-10″) and are configured with fine rip-filed teeth (15-20 ppi) for cutting along the grain (think dovetails). Thinner blades (0.02″ ish) are preferred and I like the pistol grip handle because of my big hands (see above).
Craft and fine artists use a variety of materials and techniques to create art for sale and exhibition. Craft artists create handmade objects, such as pottery, glassware, textiles, and other objects that are designed to be functional. Fine artists, including painters, sculptors, and illustrators, create original works of art for their aesthetic value, rather than for a functional one.

So just make the decision: either spend $125 (pretty affordable) for a sharp and sexy new dovetail saw or spend $50-$200 on a vintage dovetail saw that will require sharpening and likely rust removal. I typically advocate buying antique woodworking hand tools, but in the case of back saws I prefer new Lie-Nielsen saws. I don’t currently see the progressive pitch saws on Lie-Nielsen’s website, but you can always call them and ask them to file one like that for you. But the normal dovetail saw will work great.
I think the number of teeth cooresponds to stock thickness. I like to have 6 teeth in the kerf. So working with 4/4 stock mostly, I like a 4 tpi rip saw. I don’t do a lot of "rough" cross-cuts. I tend to plane first and x-cut later and often for the last time. So my x-cut saw is about 12tpi. For basic stock prep I only use a few saws- my 4 tpi rip saw, my 20" x-cut panel saw, and a fine rip saw for thin stock. For narrow stock and precision cuts I use a 14" x-cut backsaw, 12-14tpi.
Another classic game! (Are you picking up on a trend?). A cribbage board is really just a piece of wood with 240-plus holes drilled in it. This project includes files necessary to program a CNC machine to drill all the holes, but it also includes a template for boring the holes with a drill. There are endless opportunities for customizing this project with different species of wood. All this adds up to the fact that cribbage boards make great gifts.
×