This particular tray is made using reclaimed barn wood but the author of the project Beyond The Picket Fence surprised everyone with one fact: reclaimed barn wood has often some areas turned pink due to cow urine. If you check the project more closely, you’ll also notice some areas of the tray being almost bright pink. That’s something you don’t see every day!
This box is the fifth generation of this design. After each production run of about 20 boxes, I make slight design changes to enhance the look and simplify the machining. Any hardwoods would work, but since the box uses so little lumber, I prefer to incorporate highly figured woods. For safety, ease of construction and consistent cuts, I use a jig for bevel-cutting the legs and another jig for beveling the top surface of the lid.

Whether you are an experienced DIYer when it comes to woodworking projects or just starting out. This collection covers them all. One of our biggest woodworking projects is probably our shed project where we decided to build a shed from scratch. The project was quite a chore but we got it finished and love the results. I would not consider building a shed to be a beginner woodworking project, but many of the following are fantastic beginner and easy woodworking projects.


The saw's blade is precision set and has extra sharpened teeth and it has a good amount of flexibility to give you that much-needed cutting control for all sorts of cross grain cuts. For indoor and outdoor use, the GreatNeck has a weather-resistant dark stained hardwood handle and it is very comfortable to hold. The GreatNeck hand saw is covered by a lifetime warranty.
Hardwoods are separated into two categories, temperate and tropical hardwoods, depending on their origin. Temperate hardwoods are found in the regions between the tropics and poles, and are of particular interest to wood workers for their cost-effective aesthetic appeal and sustainable sources.[9] Tropical hardwoods are found within the equatorial belt, including Africa, Asia, and South America. Hardwoods flaunt a higher density, around 65lb/cu ft as a result of slower growing rates and is more stable when drying.[9] As a result of its high density, hardwoods are typically heavier than softwoods but can also be more brittle.[9] While there are an abundant number of hardwood species, only 200 are common enough and pliable enough to be used for woodworking.[11] Hardwoods have a wide variety of properties, making it easy to find a hardwood to suit nearly any purpose, but they are especially suitable for outdoor use due to their strength and resilience to rot and decay.[9] The coloring of hardwoods ranges from light to very dark, making it especially versatile for aesthetic purposes. However, because hardwoods are more closely grained, they are typically harder to work than softwoods. They are also harder to acquire in the United States and, as a result, are more expensive.[9]

Though I’d not planned to strike out on my own, in 2012, it occurred to me I had gained the experience and skills needed to do so and financially, it appeared to be a good time to make it happen. Since I had experience in the field, I chose to remain in the church furniture market but focus more on traditional styles. I’d always admired the old, high altars in European churches and hoped to build some myself. Large scale work does require more than one person, and fortunately, I was able to recruit Austin Glidewell to help establish Altare Design, LLC. By this time I’d mastered conventional woodworking techniques and possessed a working knowledge of marketing, website-building, photography, 3D modeling and business tax laws.

The moment we first saw this group’s master lather begin his work, we knew we’d found someone special.  He’s a quiet, steady-handed worker. He smiles and lets his group’s work speak for itself.  And it does. We watched in awe as he chipped away angled pieces of wood from a solid block of thick Mugavu – all done “Michelangelo-style” right in front of our eyes.

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