I was chit chatting on line with a very good professional furniture maker. He said something I had trouble agreeing with. “Well I’m a good craftsman but I don’t sharpen my saws” (that’s not exactly what he said, I’m just trying to make a point). I’m not willing to say the gentleman isn’t good, but neither am I willing to praise someone who can’t sharpen ALL his tools. You don’t send your chisels out to be sharpened, do you?
"I was considering making an offer on a house that was built in 1953, definitely a fixer-upper! Since I am a 70-year-old single woman, I needed to be sure the project would be feasible for me. Jim has impressive experience in many areas of construction, but took the time to analyze the home with my needs and skills in mind, since he had seen my previous projects. He has helped me with various aspects of the remodel, and I would highly recommend him for his abilities, integrity, work ethic, and reasonable pricing."
Working on one side at a time, glue and nail the side to the back. Apply glue and drive three 1-5/8-in. nails into each shelf, attach the other side and nail those shelves into place to secure them. Clamps are helpful to hold the unit together while you’re driving nails. Center the top piece, leaving a 2-in. overhang on both sides, and glue and nail it into place. Paint or stain the unit and then drill pilot holes into the top face of each side of the unit and screw in the hooks to hold your ironing board. Mount the shelf on drywall using screw-in wall anchors.
There are two types of electric circular saws, the worm drive and the sidewinder. The worm drive saw has enough torque to cut through wet lumber and concrete. The behind-the-blade handle placement reduces kickback, and the blade’s left-side position makes it easy to see your cut line if you’re right-handed. The sidewinder’s motor, attached directly to the blade, weighs less but also has less torque.
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