This is not exactly a tutorial, but a guide to some really cool woodworking projects. Although we are not teaching you to make anything, we are always here to help. Feel free to ask your queries in the comments in case if you face any issue while working on any of these projects. Also, tell us how much you liked this article. Did you enjoy reading it? Did you work on any of these projects, and if yes, how was your experience? You are also welcome to share any images of your completed woodwork projects. 

This practical entryway storage unit is made from solid wood and is glued together: no nails or screws (apart from those that hold it to the wall) are used. In this case, we made it out of soft maple, but it could be made from any good quality solid wood: pine, oak, birch, fir…whatever best matches the trim or furnishings in the place where it will be mounted to the wall.
Getting a smooth, blemish-free finish with oil-based polyurethane is within your grasp if you follow the steps in this article. Oil-based polyurethane varnish brings out the wood’s natural beauty or wood grain. Our 4-step approach shows you how to apply the varnish successfully. A good-quality natural-bristle brush, a reasonably dust-free, well ventilated space and some patience are all you need. Learn how to apply polyurethane.

Some of our readers prefer watching a video tutorial instead of heaving a written tutorial. For those readers, we are including a YouTube video tutorial for this project, Although, these are two a few different designs in both of the tutorials, but both of them help you in a better way to build two awesome wooden coat rack. You can find the video tutorial in the link below.


The moment we first saw this group’s master lather begin his work, we knew we’d found someone special.  He’s a quiet, steady-handed worker. He smiles and lets his group’s work speak for itself.  And it does. We watched in awe as he chipped away angled pieces of wood from a solid block of thick Mugavu – all done “Michelangelo-style” right in front of our eyes.
A hand saw comprises of two parts, the blade, and the handle. The blade will usually be made out of high carbon steel, and the handle will either be made out of thick plastic like the Vaughan or the IRWIN Tools Universal hand saw, or exquisitely hand-crafted beechwood like Crown Tools hand saw. The secret to a hand saw's cutting success lies in its jagged edge or teeth. The teeth are measured by inch and most sizes range from 9 teeth-per-inch to 17 or 20 teeth-per-inch.

Woodworkers use geometry, arithmetic, algebra, calculus, and statistics to measure materials and during the planning stages of projects.  On any given job, they will calculate sizes, dimensions, distances, and quantities of materials.  Computer skills and knowledge of relevant software also benefits woodworkers with job-estimating, project management, and basic spreadsheet or word processing.  Woodworkers should be detail-oriented, have good people skills, have steady hands, and physical strength, especially when lifting 100-pound sheets of plywood.
Perfectly customizable for any home bar or kitchen, wooden coasters are incredibly easy to make and perfect for the beginner craftsman or craftswoman. All it really takes is some precise (or imprecise, depending on the style you wish to achieve) cuts, a little to a lot of sanding, a tiny bit of finish, and the optional design you want on the coaster.
"Diego and his employees helped make my first remodeled Kitchen an enjoyable experience. From the first day, up until the final cleanup, they were friendly, helpful, and understanding. All my questions were answered, the cost was reasonable, and the workmanship was beyond what I hoped for. I would recommend Pinnacle Builders to anyone who needs a job done right the first time, by craftsman who are friendly, honest and thoughtful. Thanks again for answering all the questions my wife and I had. Pictures to be posted soon!"
Cut off a 21-in.-long board for the shelves, rip it in the middle to make two shelves, and cut 45-degree bevels on the two long front edges with a router or table saw. Bevel the ends of the other board, cut dadoes, which are grooves cut into the wood with a router or a table saw with a dado blade, cross- wise (cut a dado on scrap and test-fit the shelves first!) and cut it into four narrower boards, two at 1-3/8 in. wide and two at 4 in.

Cut the 6-1/2-in. x 3-in. lid from the leftover board, and slice the remaining piece into 1/4-in.-thick pieces for the sides and end of the box. Glue them around the plywood floor. Cut a rabbet on three sides of the lid so it fits snugly on the box and drill a 5/8-in. hole for a finger pull. Then just add a finish and you’ve got a beautiful, useful gift. If you don’t have time to make a gift this year, consider offering to do something for the person. You could offer to sharpen their knives! Here’s how.

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