It might not be the easiest project in this list, but if you already have some experience with wood cutting and joinery, it won’t be any hassle at all. Thanks to the extremely detailed instructions it shouldn’t really be a problem even if you’re not very familiar with woodworking. This could actually be a great project for refining your woodworking skills as a beginner!
Because the Dozuki has such a finely produced blade (if it is a quality saw) then the smallest of deflection while using one hand allows it to track away from your intended cut. Note: If you hold one hand out in front of you with no saw in it, and your hand folded as if you were holding the saw, then pull your hand back as if you were cutting (without trying to keep it straight), you will notice that your hand will twist usually to the inside, but not always--there lies the problem--since you need only one stroke to throw the tracking off.

Stranded: Here is a link; http://www.leevalley.com/US/shopping/Instructions.aspx?p=41059 to some info for the various Japanese saws where they briefly discuss using two hands and also mention Westerners having a problem with that technique? Just to take the topic a little further: If you are doing small dovetails or small tenons, you might get away with one hand because the depth of cut is usually shallow. And if you are using a Japanese dovetail saw with back stiffener that will help with tracking. Personally I like to start my cut with one hand (1/16-1/8" depth), usually on the corner closest to me then switch to two hands always with a gentle grip to let the saw do the cutting, sometimes with a dusting of pounce on my hands for a better grip, but not tight. I have been using this technique for many years and still find little subtleties (mindfulness) that provide improvement. Practice, Practice, Practice--Enjoy, Mainewood
I’ve got a three other bits of advice: First of all, get really, really good at woodworking. There are lots of people who enjoy it as a hobby. To sell your services, you’ve got to be able to do far superior work or do it much faster than everyone else (preferably both). Failure to do so means competing against hundreds of amateurs who make things for the pleasure of it, then sell their work at cost to fund the hobby. Second, develop great people skills. Most professionals do custom work and few focus on selling a product. Most of them sell a service, and a big part of that is getting customers to enjoy the experience of collaborating with a woodworker to create their dream products. If your customers don’t like you, they can usually save time and money by getting something from an online catalog. People who buy handcrafted items from woodworkers are often attracted to the idea of supporting artisans. The face behind the work is important to them. Last, develop an iron-clad work ethic. In this field you’re directly trading time for money, and that time is very limited. It’s important to be productive, so try to get 40 hours of actual productivity (as in making things) every week. Accounting, phone conversations and social media marketing may be important, but none of them provide an actual paycheck, so they don’t count as productive work.
The best thing about this wine rack is that it is very easy to build. All you need is the basic understanding of woodworking and a few tools to get started. You can modify your wine rack any way you want or build in a design or color different from this one. The basic steps to build a wooden wine rack are the same for all variants. I have included here the video tutorial that I followed in order to build myself a pallet wide rack.
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