My hands-down favorite thing to do is develop the process for manufacturing a new product. This involves figuring out how to design a product so that it’s not only durable and functional, but also economical to build. Then all the jigs, fixtures and CNC programs have to be created and tested until the whole process is running smoothly. Up to now, the most challenging project has been our line of wooden sunglasses which were developed for a specific client. We spent hundreds of hours just figuring out how to build the first pair then hundreds more hours refining the process until they became profitable.
These 25 projects are absolutely stunning, to say the least. I would love to try out some of these designs all by myself and get started with some serious woodworking that I have been procrastinating for a long time. My favorites among these 25 are definitely the desk organizer, the bowling lane, and the tiered planter, but nevertheless, all are good in their own ways. I believe these projects only require hand tools and basic power tools like a rudimentary router and a jigsaw.
A good Japanese pull saw isn't cheap, perhaps $60-75, and they have to be replaced when dull. They also tend to be brittle and teeth can break off if you nick them on your vice. Also, after trying to improve my technique for 9 years, I still can't follow a straight line, the saw goes where it wants to. My newest Japanese saw came with instructions that said to grip the handle with two hands, which I had never thought about nor read anywhere. Could you comment on that, Matt? Thanks.
There are two types of electric circular saws, the worm drive and the sidewinder. The worm drive saw has enough torque to cut through wet lumber and concrete. The behind-the-blade handle placement reduces kickback, and the blade’s left-side position makes it easy to see your cut line if you’re right-handed. The sidewinder’s motor, attached directly to the blade, weighs less but also has less torque.
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