Shorter hand saws (around 20-inches long) are officially called “panel saws” because they can fit in the panel of a large tool chest, and they are more suited for fine furniture making. Most normal hand saws run from 24-inches to 30-inches long. Many people mistakenly call all saws of this type “panel saws”. But don’t be rude and correct them! Try out different sizes to see what length you’re comfortable with.
Commonly used woodworking tools included axes, adzes, chisels, pull saws, and bow drills. Mortise and tenon joints are attested from the earliest Predynastic period. These joints were strengthened using pegs, dowels and leather or cord lashings. Animal glue came to be used only in the New Kingdom period.[3] Ancient Egyptians invented the art of veneering and used varnishes for finishing, though the composition of these varnishes is unknown. Although different native acacias were used, as was the wood from the local sycamore and tamarisk trees, deforestation in the Nile valley resulted in the need for the importation of wood, notably cedar, but also Aleppo pine, boxwood and oak, starting from the Second Dynasty.[4]
Hardwoods are separated into two categories, temperate and tropical hardwoods, depending on their origin. Temperate hardwoods are found in the regions between the tropics and poles, and are of particular interest to wood workers for their cost-effective aesthetic appeal and sustainable sources.[9] Tropical hardwoods are found within the equatorial belt, including Africa, Asia, and South America. Hardwoods flaunt a higher density, around 65lb/cu ft as a result of slower growing rates and is more stable when drying.[9] As a result of its high density, hardwoods are typically heavier than softwoods but can also be more brittle.[9] While there are an abundant number of hardwood species, only 200 are common enough and pliable enough to be used for woodworking.[11] Hardwoods have a wide variety of properties, making it easy to find a hardwood to suit nearly any purpose, but they are especially suitable for outdoor use due to their strength and resilience to rot and decay.[9] The coloring of hardwoods ranges from light to very dark, making it especially versatile for aesthetic purposes. However, because hardwoods are more closely grained, they are typically harder to work than softwoods. They are also harder to acquire in the United States and, as a result, are more expensive.[9]
To start off this list of simple woodworking projects is a DIY sawhorse which will be very helpful to you if you don’t own a ShopBot Buddy. A sawhorse always comes in handy especially if you have more plans of woodworking in the future. Before you get started on this woodworking project, get one of these extension cords with built-in outlets for your power tools to help you out!
Fir, also known as Douglas Fir, is very inexpensive and common at local home centers. It has a characteristic straight, pronounced grain with a red-brown tint. However, its grain pattern is relatively plain and it does not stain well, so Fir is commonly used when the finished product will be painted. While commonly used for building, this softwood would also be suitable for furniture-making as well.[12]
Building a Wooden Office Desk Organizer is an easy task for a professional woodworker, but not so much for normal people like you and me. But that doesn’t mean you cannot do this. Two years ago, I had almost no woodworking experience, but now I make most of my household and office wooden items by myself. This saves me a lot of money. And believe me when I say this; you can also manage to make wonderful wood items with a little practice and some woodworking experience.
Whether you are a DIY home maintenance enthusiast or a professional tradesman, the Irwin Tools hand saw is the only saw you will ever need. A super fast cutting tool, the Irwin Tools Universal hand saw will have you powering through all sorts of cutting-related tasks from detailed woodworking, carpentry or general DIY maintenance and its compact blade means it is easy to use in tight spots.
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