This box is the fifth generation of this design. After each production run of about 20 boxes, I make slight design changes to enhance the look and simplify the machining. Any hardwoods would work, but since the box uses so little lumber, I prefer to incorporate highly figured woods. For safety, ease of construction and consistent cuts, I use a jig for bevel-cutting the legs and another jig for beveling the top surface of the lid. 

I went through the handsaw epiphany a few years back. Hadn’t used a well sharpened handsaw since I was a kid, and didn’t understand why my later attempts at using hand saws seemed to end in discontent. I avoided saws without tails for years, then stumbled across an old D8 Thumbhole. Research on the internet led me to several good sites on saws and sharpening and when I gave it a shot I was amazed at how well even my shoddily sharpened saw worked. Saw sharpening is truly not difficult to do, and you get better at it real fast. I take an old Disston #112 crosscut that I rehandled with me to the wood store and you ought to see the looks when folks see me in the parking lot breaking those 12 foot long boards down by hand to a size more amenable to being carried home in the back of my truck.
Slice, dice and serve in style on this easy, attractive board. We’ll show you a simple way to dry-fit the parts, scribe the arc and then glue the whole thing together. We used a 4-ft. steel ruler to scribe the arcs, but a yardstick or any thin board would also work. Find complete how-to instructions on this woodworking crafts project here. Also, be sure to use water-resistant wood glue and keep your board out of the dishwasher or it might fall apart. And one more thing: Keep the boards as even as possible during glue-up to minimize sanding later. For great tips on gluing wood, check out this collection.
Woodworkers use geometry, arithmetic, algebra, calculus, and statistics to measure materials and during the planning stages of projects.  On any given job, they will calculate sizes, dimensions, distances, and quantities of materials.  Computer skills and knowledge of relevant software also benefits woodworkers with job-estimating, project management, and basic spreadsheet or word processing.  Woodworkers should be detail-oriented, have good people skills, have steady hands, and physical strength, especially when lifting 100-pound sheets of plywood.
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Source tutorial includes all the details about every single step with images and diagrams. You will get to know everything deeply in the source tutorial. Although, this a professional woodworker’s project, but it doesn’t mean that you can’t do it. If I can do it, then you can do it too. You have to know some basic woodworking knowledge first and should have some basic skills of using woodworking tools.
As soon as I came across this tutorial, I didn’t wait any longer to start building one. Some of the items you need for this project are hardwood plywood, saw, glue, nails, drilling machine, etc. The video is very easy to follow for anyone with basic woodworking knowledge and experience. The first source link also includes a step by step procedure in plain English for those, who are not comfortable enough with the video tutorial.
A dozuki saw has a thin, flexible blade, with fine teeth and a straight handle, which makes it well-suited to flush-cutting pegs. The flexible tip helps it get close to the base of a pin, and the straight handle is easier to hold and control with the saw on its side than a pistol grip would be. Get a crosscut dozuki with about 20 tpi. So why not just use a flush-cut saw? Their teeth have no set, so they clog and don’t cut as well. Dozukis don’t have those problems. The thin blade can kink, so get a saw with a replaceable blade.

Popular and easy to work with, cherry is in high demand for its reddish-brown color and ease of staining and finishing. Cherry likely won’t be at the local home center, but should be at a lumberyard for a somewhat expensive price.[12] This hardwood is a very common material for furniture, and is resistant to normal wear-and-tear, but it is best for indoor pieces.[13]
Drill four 5/8-in.-dia. 1/2-in.-deep holes on the large disc?inside the traced circle?then use 5/8-in. dowel centers to transfer the hole locations to the underside of the small disc. Drill four 1/2-in.-deep holes on the underside of the small disc and a 1/2-in.-deep hole in the center of the top for the dowel handle. Glue in the dowels to join the discs, and glue in the handle. We drilled a wood ball for a handle knob, but a screw-on ceramic knob also provides a comfortable, attractive grip.
Upon graduating from high school, I wasn’t sure exactly what career to pursue, but I knew it had to be something that involved creating things with my hands. I’d always had natural talent working with tools, and despite having been an A-average student, I was never fond of conventional academics. Not having better plans at the time, I took one calculus course, got an “A”, then promptly decided two things: I didn’t enjoy college and taking on any debt would force me into a dull, conventional 9-5 job until the debt could be paid off. I didn’t know this back then, but I was pretty much a textbook case of the restless student with the entrepreneurial spirit. Just a few months later, I got the opportunity to accept an apprenticeship at Remmert Studios which was an incredible break. It was a result of reading a local newspaper article about the business, then going to meet the owner. Not many are able to break into woodworking that easily, especially in the high-end market. That company did a lot of contemporary furniture for churches, and being short-staffed, it wasn’t long before I was given a full-time position.While working that job, I was also taking week-long classes at Marc Adams School of Woodworking as time and money permitted. The combination of hands-on work and classroom study allowed me to acquire new skills very quickly. Being at the school also netted an internship opportunity with one of North America’s most prestigious furniture-makers, Michael Fortune.
Woodworkers are employed in every part of the secondary wood products industry, from sawmill to finished product, and their activities vary. They set up, operate, and tend all types of woodworking machines, such as drill presses, lathes, shapers, routers, sanders, planers, and wood-nailing machines. Operators set up the equipment, cut and shape wooden parts, and verify dimensions, using a template, caliper, and rule.
Aside from modern heirloom saws (like Lie-Nielsen & other high-end custom saw makers) I would stay away from any cheap hand saws manufactured after World War II. Yes, this is the same advice that I gave with hand planes. Tool quality really declined after WWII. What brands should you look for? Historically there were a lot of hand saw makers, because saws are easier to manufacture than hand planes. Here are some of the old and new quality saw makers (in alphabetical order). The blue links lead to eBay and other searches for those hand saw brands so you can compare different models (some of the antique brands are not always available on eBay, so keep checking back): 

Woodworker’s work environments vary depending on job duties.  If a woodworker is employed to handle and cut large heavy materials, he or she may work in a factory setting. Cabinet and countertop woodworkers typically work in large or small manufacturing plants. Some woodworkers work in sawmills, while other’s work out of home shops.  In 2014, there were just over 237,000 jobs for all woodworkers, with other wood product manufacturing employing 23 percent; wood kitchen cabinets and countertop manufacturing employing 21 percent.  Most woodworkers work a regular, full-time workweek.
"I was considering making an offer on a house that was built in 1953, definitely a fixer-upper! Since I am a 70-year-old single woman, I needed to be sure the project would be feasible for me. Jim has impressive experience in many areas of construction, but took the time to analyze the home with my needs and skills in mind, since he had seen my previous projects. He has helped me with various aspects of the remodel, and I would highly recommend him for his abilities, integrity, work ethic, and reasonable pricing."
What about building a moon cradle for your baby? Using your woodworking skills to make this yourself can be not only cheaper than buying the one from the store, but it is also an opportunity to unwind, to use your skills, to use your hands and to work together with your loved once. There are plenty of small baby cradle designs on the internet, but we find this one more easy and elegant.
Don’t be afraid to ask if there are internship or apprenticeship opportunities. Even if you’re declined, people will know you’re looking, and if you continue to hang out in their circles and demonstrate that you’d be a model employee, someone will take notice. There’s no shortage of woodworkers, but there is a severe shortage of enthusiastic and phenomenal woodworkers.
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