Although the term “woodworker” may evoke the image of a craftsman who uses handtools to build ornate furniture, the modern woodworking trade is highly technical and relies on advanced equipment and highly skilled operators. Workers use automated machinery, such as computerized numerical control (CNC) machines, to do much of the work with great accuracy.
Any serious woodworker knows that square and flat Any serious woodworker knows that square and flat stock is the key to producing fine work so it’s time to skip the hand tools and graduate to the JJ-6HHDX 6 in. long bed jointer. This beast boasts a helical insert cutter head with staggered carbide inserts yet runs quietly and ...  More + Product Details Close
"Cody did such a incredible job! He not only gave me my dream kitchen, but he was also so personable, professional, and kind. While he was here I also had some other things that needed fixed around the house and he was happy to help with. A master of all trades. 10/10 have recommended to all my friends and will have him do future things to our home when needed."
The number of saw teeth per inch (or points per inch) is another important factor in selecting a hand saw for a particular purpose. Large hand saw teeth will cut quickly through the wood, but will leave a rough surface. Small hand saw teeth will cut finely and accurately, but are not practical for cutting long lengths or widths. When dealing with normal hand saws or frame saws, “Rip” teeth are typically larger than “Cross Cut” teeth. In back saws, rip and cross-cut teeth can vary in size. The number of teeth per inch are usually expressed as “points per inch” (ppi) or “teeth per inch” (tpi) and the number is usually stamped into the saw plate. However, you can change the tooth count during your sharpening. Here are examples of large (rough) and small (fine) hand saw teeth:

My hands-down favorite thing to do is develop the process for manufacturing a new product. This involves figuring out how to design a product so that it’s not only durable and functional, but also economical to build. Then all the jigs, fixtures and CNC programs have to be created and tested until the whole process is running smoothly. Up to now, the most challenging project has been our line of wooden sunglasses which were developed for a specific client. We spent hundreds of hours just figuring out how to build the first pair then hundreds more hours refining the process until they became profitable.
Turning an old door into a photo frame is another easy woodwork project. All you need is an old door and some woodworking tools and items. I am here sharing the link to the source tutorial that explains the step by step procedure for building a picture frame from an old wooden door. This tutorial was originally written by Tracy Snyder at athomewithsweett.blogspot.com who also tells you what items you may need and where to find them. If you haven’t already got an old door, you can purchase one from websites like Craigslist.

Sharpening a saw is not hard. Type “saw sharpening” into your favorite web browser tonight, buy a couple files, and get to it. Here’s my trick: count your strokes. If the teeth are fairly uniform in their dullness (i.e. a tiny white snow cap, roughly the same size, appears on each, not every other tooth) just use one or two strokes per tooth. Do only the teeth set near you, then turn the saw around and do the other side.
Working with reclaimed wood is a savvy use of resources, and the material's country appeal is undeniable. With just a saw and a small drill, you can reuse old fencing to make these simple woodworking projects: picket-inspired picture frames. Finish them off by hot-gluing clothespins or bulldog clips to hang your prints. Here’s a step-by-step guide.
Because the Dozuki has such a finely produced blade (if it is a quality saw) then the smallest of deflection while using one hand allows it to track away from your intended cut. Note: If you hold one hand out in front of you with no saw in it, and your hand folded as if you were holding the saw, then pull your hand back as if you were cutting (without trying to keep it straight), you will notice that your hand will twist usually to the inside, but not always--there lies the problem--since you need only one stroke to throw the tracking off.
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